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Kenning Editions proudly announces the first in the Ordinance series, Memories of my Overdevelopment, by Daniel Borzutzky.

Memories of my Overdevelopment reflects on the politics of translation, transnationalism, neoliberalism and the author’s life as a Chilean-American poet living in Chicago.  Through essays, poems and hybrid forms.  Borzutzky develops an argument about the continuums of economic and political violence that translate across borders, reversing the stereotypical belief that the US controls South America, and not the other way around.  Here, translation is a means of showing that the “neoliberal policy lab” of Chicago could not exist without the influence of pre-existing economic experiments in Chile and Latin America.

Daniel Borzutzky is the author of the poetry collections The Performance of Becoming Human (Brooklyn Arts Press, 2016), In the Murmurs of the Rotten Carcass Economy (Nightboat, 2015), The Book of Interfering Bodies (Nightboat, 2011), The Ecstasy of Capitulation (BlazeVox, 2007); the chapbooks Bedtime Stories for the End of the World (Bloof Books, 2014), Data Bodies (The Green Lantern, 2013), One Size Fits All (Scantily Clad Press, 2009), and Failure of the Imagination (Bronze Skull Press 2007); and a collection of short stories, Arbitrary Tales (Ravenna Press, 2005). He has translated Raúl Zurita’sThe Country of Planks (Action Books, 2015) and Song for His Disappeared Love (Action Books, 2010); and Jaime Luis Huenún’s Port Trakl (Action Books, 2008). His writing has been translated into Spanish, French, Bulgarian, and Turkish, and has been anthologized in, among other publications, Angels of the Americlypse: An Anthology of New Latin@ Writing; La Alteración del Silencio: Poesía Norteamericana RecienteMalditos Latinos Malditos Sudacas: Poesia Iberoamericana Made in USAA Best of Fence: The First Nine Years; and The City Visible: Chicago Poetry for the New Century. Borzutzky’s work has been recognized by grants from the PEN American Center and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Ordinance, a critical series, issues nonfiction writing in the areas of contemporary poetics, philosophy, politics, and technology. Ordinance as in coordination, ordinal points, and incendiary potential with greater stamina than yesterday’s feed. Each chapbook in the series is handmade, perfect bound, and portable. The Ordinance series is available by subscription ($35.00 for all) and Individual titles may be purchased ($7.00). Free PDF downloads of each book will be available at Kenningeditions.com. The series will be complete by the end of 2016, with ten titles in all. Next are essays by Julietta Cheung, Daniel Spangler, Andrew Durbin, Cassandra Troyan, Margit Säde and others.

Ordinance

Kenning Editions’ new nonfiction series, 2015-2016

Ordinance, a critical series, issues nonfiction writing in the areas of contemporary poetics, philosophy, politics, and technology. Ordinance as in coordination, ordinal points, and incendiary potential. Ordinance offers in chapbook form essays and other texts with greater stamina than yesterday’s feed. They will also be available to read on screen.

Beginning in June, Kenning Editions will publish a new chapbook in the series every couple of months. These are slender, handmade, perfectbound books. The first set features work by Julietta Cheung (on global product culture as enunciation), Daniel Borzutsky (on translation and Chicago School economics), Andrew Durbin (on Donna Summer), and Daniel Spangler (on operating systems, God, and Deleuze). 2016 begins with Cassandra Troyan (on social reproduction, emotional labor, sex work, & gendered violence). The series will carry on from there and updates will be posted to Kenningeditions.com and elsewhere.

Although you may purchase individual titles at $7.00 each, you may subscribe to the series for a mere $35.00 and receive them all as they are printed. International orders add a $15.00 shipping fee.

Meanwhile, Hannah Weiner has had her first museum show, and Trisha Low has been busy this spring castigating the culture (for its own benefit–see what I mean here). And if you plan to be in Chicago next winter, you can look forward to attending a poets theater festival we are coordinating with the good citizens at Sector 2337. To help everyone prepare, the Weiner, Low, and Kenning Anthology of Poets Theater books are on sale for the next week or so.

We have more planned, but nothing we’re ready to confide just now. Stay tuned and help spread the word.

Trisha Low left a trail of dead this spring, and to help you follow along:

Here is the first of a few “National Poetry Month” posts for the Poetry Foundation:

I mean the truth is that poetry is not anything really that morally superior or good or exciting, it’s like not even as good as the green frosting on a CVS cupcake that could maybe redeem itself because it tastes 0.5% like a jolly rancher…

Here is Low’s series On Being Hated from the SFMoma’s Open Space blog:

From heavy leather jackets to tattoos, subcultural markers tend to also become visual calcifications of form, stiff materialization without which there is only reason to flee, or worse still, no reason not to die. Another word for existence is survival. Maybe without performing being-hated, whatever bullshit pain you feel is only a fucking compromise. Maybe performing being-hated is a simple case of desiring better, wanting different.

Here at Lemonhound is a book review she wrote, sizing up Brandon Brown and Steven Zultanski’s new books:

Like it or not, the feminine confessional has transmutated itself from male fascination to a mode of transgression, revenge, cold-blooded violence, out of necessity – because the fetishism surrounding this genre has always at least ensured that the work is even read. The feminine confessional can do. But this has always come at a higher cost to the author. We are weak, or vulnerable and sexy because of it, we are nuts, or narcissistic, or should drown ourselves à la Virginia Woolf. We are cute but talentless.

And another good book is Ben Fama’s Fantasy. Low and Fama discuss at The Believer:

You’re very unflappable. I’m trying to embarrass you here.

At The Operating System is a review of Low’s own Compleat Purge:

I’ve wanted to write about The Compleat Purge for a while, however, I’ve felt prevented from doing so by the fact that the book is, in a sense, a step ahead of me: it’s already dialoging with the thinkers and theoretical frameworks that I, as a critic, would like to put it into conversation with. Trisha is a poet who does theory: her work contains the critical apparatus through which to apprehend it. The Compleat Purge writes its own review. The Compleat Purge swallows the place of the critic.

I’ve been meaning to tell you that Patrick Durgin and Jesse Seldess will be reading at 7:00 PM next Wednesday, March 25th, at Unnameable Books (600 Vanderbilt Ave, Brooklyn, NY). The event is free, and it is only a short subway ride to St. Mark’s Church, where, later that night, Tan Lin reads with Mei-Mei Burssenbrugge, and both discuss their work with Dorothy Wang, author of Thinking Its Presence. The last chapter of Wang’s book is on Pamela Lu.

Durgin will give a talk on a poets theater panel this April at AWP. The conference is in Minneapolis this year.

Trisha Low has posted a bewilderingly great essay to the SFMOMA “Open Space” blog, here.

Tonight, curator Franziska Glozer’s exhibition devoted to the work of Hannah Weiner opens at the Kunsthalle Zürich. Testing the hypothesis that Weiner’s clair-style writing foreshadowed contemporary virtual semiotic circuits, Glozer is possibly the first since the Dwan Gallery’s “Language” exhibits in the early 1960s to exhibit her work as written objects. See the press release for more information on the show and related events hosted by the museum.

The Clairvoyant Journal, Weiner’s best known book, has been reset and reissued in print by BAT Editions. See Patrick Durgin’s long form introduction to book, and order a copy for yourself, right here.

Jesse Seldess will be reading at the Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco the evening of December 13. (Details.) Seldess is the author of Who Opens and Left Having. Let’s celebrate this rare opportunity to hear his inimitable pronouncements in the Bay Area–the last time he was there to read may have been 2007?–by discounting the books for the period leading up to the event. Buy early and often.

Jesse Seldess on Penn Sound.

Chicago is fortunate to receive visiting authors Trisha Low and Rodney Koeneke, this coming weekend at its best, new gallery and event space, Sector 2337.

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Rodney Koeneke and Trisha Low reading at Sector 2337

2337 N Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago, Saturday November 8, 2014, 7:00 PM

Rodney Koeneke’s Etruria is just out from Wave Books. Earlier collections include Musee Mechanique (BlazeVOX, 2006) and Rouge State (Pavement Saw, 2003). Recent work can be found in The Brooklyn Rail, Fence, Granta, Gulf Coast, The Nation, and at Harriet, where he was August’s Featured Writer. A longtime resident of the San Francisco Bay Area, he currently lives in Portland, Oregon, where he teaches British and World History.

Trisha Low is committed to wearing a shock collar because she has so many feelings. She is the author of The Compleat Purge (Kenning Editions, 2013). Remote controls are available at Gauss PDF, Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing, Troll Thread and others. She lives in New York City.

Sector 2337 is a storefront gallery and bookstore at 2337 N Milwaukee Avenue. Functioning as Head Quarters for the Green Lantern Press, Sector 2337 will host three exhibitions a year, maintain a vibrant schedule of public programs, as well as a niche on-line bookstore and an in-store bookshelf specializing in contemporary art, poetry, theory, and independent press titles. By marrying these threads — contemporary exhibitions, readings, performances, poetry, and printed matter — we continue the spirit of The Green Lantern Gallery and Press, making community, culture, and discourse easily accessible to Chicago.

Admission is free and the venue is ADA accessible. This event is sponsored by Kenning Editions with support from Poets & Writers, Inc.

A series of 3-D prints / artist’s books / written objects

Singles (2014) is a series of five 3-D acrylic prints with the dimensions of 45 RPM vinyl records, housed in glossy, transparent plastic sleeves. The faux labels feature minimalist couplets printed in reflective opposition. The language lends volume to font and type cases that cite the golden era of Jamaican dub music. The language intrudes or extrudes from the queasy greenish-white “vinyl” itself, and the grooves are replaced by a single, sunken band. An unlimited edition in a series of five, Singles negotiates print culture as skeuomorphic nostalgia for environmental detritus, with the caveat that intellect and sentiment serve as bordering ecosystems for the grand archive that is “the” environment. It is also a critique of contemporary artisanal capitalism.

You will receive a signed copy of the limited edition Daughter when you order the complete set. More information can be found here.

Patrick Durgin is the author of several books, including PQRS. Durgin is also editor of Hannah Weiner’s Open House and The Early and Clairvoyant Journals of Hannah Weiner. He teaches critical theory, literature, and writing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Patrick Durgin @ Pennsound and @ EPC

Forthcoming is an artist’s statement regarding Singles, as one of Durgin’s series of Commentaries for Jacket2, entitled Witness.

An Invitation to Disorder, i.e. an interview with Jean-Marie Gleize, author of Tarnac, a preparatory act, now up at the Bomb Magazine site.

It seems to me that all artistic practice implies a form of retreat—a chosen and provisional solitude, a necessary distance for a right vision of things, to establish the conditions that might favor concentration and reflection. Of course, this retreat and solitude does not imply a rupture with reality, context, and others. On the contrary, it is a modality of our presence. It is for us the real way to face things, to maximize our capacity for intervention, action, and activation.

Rodney Koeneke and Trisha Low reading at Sector 2337

2337 N Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago, Saturday November 8, 2014, 7:00 PM

Rodney Koeneke’s Etruria is just out from Wave Books. Earlier collections include Musee Mechanique (BlazeVOX, 2006) and Rouge State (Pavement Saw, 2003). Recent work can be found in The Brooklyn Rail, Fence, Granta, Gulf Coast, The Nation, and at Harriet, where he was August’s Featured Writer. A longtime resident of the San Francisco Bay Area, he currently lives in Portland, Oregon, where he teaches British and World History.

Trisha Low is committed to wearing a shock collar because she has so many feelings. She is the author of The Compleat Purge (Kenning Editions, 2013). Remote controls are available at Gauss PDF, Against Expression: An Anthology of Conceptual Writing, Troll Thread and others. She lives in New York City.

Sector 2337 is a storefront gallery and bookstore opening this October at 2337 N Milwaukee Avenue. Functioning as Head Quarters for the Green Lantern Press, Sector 2337 will host three exhibitions a year, maintain a vibrant schedule of public programs, as well as a niche on-line bookstore and an in-store bookshelf specializing in contemporary art, poetry, theory, and independent press titles. By marrying these threads — contemporary exhibitions, readings, performances, poetry, and printed matter — we continue the spirit of The Green Lantern Gallery and Press, making community, culture, and discourse easily accessible to Chicago.

Admission is free and the venue is ADA accessible. Sponsored by Kenning Editions, with support from Poets & Writers, Inc.

Naropa is hosting the Dis_embodied Poetics Conference, “Writing, Thinking, Being” this October 10-12, with an outstanding roster including Amber DiPietra and Denise Leto, authors of Waveform.

Says the conference website:

[DIS]EMBODIED POETICS is a 3-day biennial conference that explores intersections between innovative forms of creative and critical writing that are experientially rooted in contemplative practice. We are interested in experiment, activism, performance, the archive, somatic practices, dharma arts, cross-genre, borderlands, the liminal, cross-disciplinary gestures, third-mind collaborations, bricolage, conceptual poetics, the five wisdoms of Maitri, mindful awareness, consciousness, Butoh, biorhythms, neo-benshi, and more.

 

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